Plastic-free Shoreline Restoration

Most Indian River Lagoon oyster reefs have disappeared due to polluted water, over-harvesting, and other harmful human activities. Non-profit groups dedicated to improving the water quality of Florida’s waterways examine new shoreline restoration techniques as a possible solution.

Oyster Volcanos provide preferred habitat for young oysters, known as spat, to attach to and thrive. January 13, 2022, Marine Resources Council (MRC) of Palm Bay staff and volunteers collaborated with partner Marine Discovery Center of New Smyrna Beach to build concrete structures resembling 12-inch tall volcanos. Crushed shells and live seagrass will be attached to the structures to create an enticing home for young oysters to settle. Once deployed in the Canaveral National Seashore, these oyster volcanos will also provide habitat for many fish, filter feeders, and invertebrates.

There are many benefits to using this restoration technique — it’s plastic-free, diffuses wave action to help prevent shoreline erosion, and provides a preferred pH for oyster spat to settle on. MRC extends thanks to the volunteers involved with this project; we only succeed through your love of the Indian River Lagoon.

Find our more about shoreline restoration efforts here.

For information on how you can volunteer to help, please visit https://savetheirl.org/get-involved/volunteer/.

 

Oyster Volcano Workshop